Three impossible things before breakfast

It’s official: the world has gone topsy-turvy.

1)  Attorney General Eric Holder has questioned the constitutionality of Arizona’s immigration law and said it  “has the possibility of leading to racial profiling.” But he hasn’t read it.

See Glenn Reynolds.

2) The NY Times has been barred, by the White House, from speaking to Elena Kagan’s brother.

The New York Times received permission on Tuesday from Hunter College High School in Manhattan, Elena Kagan’s alma mater, to observe a constitutional law class there taught by her brother Irving. We thought it would be intriguing to watch the give and take between Mr. Kagan, who is known as a passionate and interactive educator, and his students on his first day back after witnessing his sister’s nomination in Washington.

Mr. Kagan, who is also a Hunter alumnus, did not have a problem with the idea, a school spokeswoman said, but she added that all media requests now had to be given final approval by the White House. The times were tentatively set: there was either an 8:52 a.m. class or a 9:36 a.m. class on Wednesday. “I thought it would have been great,” said the spokeswoman, Meredith Halpern.

But when presented with the idea, the White House balked.

Joshua Earnest, a White House spokesman, said that the administration was “uncomfortable with the idea at this time.” [. . .]

A formal proposal has been submitted to the White House, which the administration requested. They asked that it outline the intent and goal of the article in significant detail.

Wouldn’t it be interesting if Kagan’s brother, or cousin, also suddenly mum, chose to go over the head of their White House minders and talk to the press anyway?

3)  There’s a bill before Congress that will mandate tracking the body mass index of all children, ages 2 – 18.

The Healthy Choices Act–introduced by Rep. Ron Kind (D-Wis.), a member of the House Ways and Means Committee–would establish and fund a wide range of programs and regulations aimed at reducing obesity rates by such means as putting nutritional labels on the front of food products, subsidizing businesses that provide fresh fruits and vegetables, and collecting BMI measurements of patients and counseling those that are overweight or obese.

Choice has become the dirtiest of dirty words. But Big Brother is only trying to make our lives easier:

At a press conference last week to announce the introduction of the bill, Kind emphasized it would help “busy American families.”

“Making the healthy choice the easy choice for our families is essential to ensuring our quality of life,” Kind said. “I am pleased to work on legislation that helps provide the opportunities that meet the needs of busy American families.”

Nudge.

RedState’s Dan McLaughlin comments:

Let’s leave aside the many methodological problems with BMI as a measurement of obesity (such as the fact that muscular, athletic males are almost always classed as obese). The bill requires federal taxpayers to lay out yet more money to create yet another intrusive apparatus for tracking and storing information that, for example, your 16 year old daughter might regard as rather personal . . . .

Read the rest.

Related:

Is your child’s BMI the government’s business?

Hiding the decline on the childhood obesity rate

The audacity of anti-obesity

Does this health plan make me look fat?

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