Defying China’s one-child policy

. . . one girl-child at a time. Fighting the power, and pulling a few strings:

“There were some difficult times,” Mr Fu conceded. “We were chased around and we had to live like beggars. But I never thought about doing otherwise. I’m aware that many people do not want their daughters, but we have a decent respect for life. In China, we think that when you have a child it is like dropping a piece of your own body from you, and we never considered the other options,” he said.

[. . .]

“When they eventually found out I had seven daughters, they tried to tear down our house, but fortunately I have good connections: my uncle is the head of the village,” said Mr Fu. “They also wanted to fine me 600,000 yuan (£60,000). But I refused to pay them. Eventually they knocked down just a small part of my old house and I paid them 2,000 yuan,” he added.

Mr Fu said that he knew several other people in his village who also had more than one child and that he had already encouraged his eldest daughter, who has recently born him a grandson, to continue to procreate. “I told her: no matter what the cost, she should have more kids,” he said.

Mr. Fu isn’t the only one. If he were, there wouldn’t be an unexplained jump between the 1990 and 2000 census counts:

Examining China’s census figures, Mr Liang came across discrepancies that proved the subterfuge. “In 1990, the national census recorded 23 million births. But by the 2000 census, there were 26 million ten-year-old children, an increase of three million,” he said. “Normally, you would expect there to be fewer ten-year-olds than newborns, because of infant mortality,” he added.

His findings suggest that the one-child policy may not have the grim consequences that have been widely predicted.

Let us pray that’s true. Read the rest.

h/t: Hot Air headlines